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President Obama tried to stanch mounting criticism of his health care law this week by announcing that state regulators can let insurance companies renew policies for 2014 that don't meet minimum requirements of the Affordable Care Act. But the change isn't sitting well with some state insurance regulators, and several say they won't go along with Obama's idea.

Candidate John F. Kennedy was young, energetic and handsome, and he knew how to harness the power of mass media. Fifty years after the president's death, candidates are still following his lead.

To combat an influx of undocumented economic migrants, Israel has built a 150-mile fence across its southern border, cutting the rate of illegal entry dramatically. However, there are tens of thousands of 'infiltrators' already in the country, and the government wants to separate them from the rest of Israel.

Winston and Pansy Greene are getting on with their lives despite Pansy's Alzheimer's disease. In the three years since her diagnosis, little has changed, though the couple is starting to have different takes on the future. Pansy has remained positive; Winston says with no cure, he has to be realistic.

President Obama admitting to fumbling the ball on the healthcare website. But is 'sorry' enough - or does someone have to be sidelined? Host Michel Martin talks to the Barbershop guys about the week's news. Writer Jimi Izrael, Corey Dade of The Root, law professor Paul Butler and healthcare consultant Neil Minkoff weigh in.

Behind all our material goods, from iPhones to sneakers, is a narrative of exploited Chinese workers with bleak lives. Reporter Leslie T. Chang says that's a disrespectful narrative. She sought out workers in a Chinese megacities and tells their stories.

There are some truths that we believe in wholeheartedly — but what if we're completely wrong? Once we separate fact from fiction, how do our perceptions change? In this hour, TED speakers move beyond conventional wisdom to reveal complex realities about what we think we know to be true.

While the aid effort continues to ramp up, many in the typhoon-ravaged nation are still waiting for food, water and adequate shelter. "Nothing. Nothing happened," said one survivor Friday, after waiting hours for food aid that never arrived.

Medicare has tied incentive payments and penalties to two-dozen quality measurements, including surveys of patient satisfaction and death rates. More than 1,200 hospitals are receiving bonuses. But more hospitals are being paid less for each Medicare patient they treat for the year that began Oct. 1.

Laura Lane was heading to work when her train got stuck. Conductor Paquita Williams was soon walking through the cars, putting passengers at ease in the darkness. Laura was so impressed with how Paquita handled the two-hour ordeal, she wanted to learn more about her.

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