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The origin of the bagel "is somewhat mysterious," says a writer who recently explored the topic. What is unquestionable is that bagel met and married lox in New York. But as in so many modern unions, both partners came to the marriage with plenty of baggage.

Observers say the president's recent fumbles on Syria and other issues have emboldened Republicans. But President Obama's supporters say he has the upper hand when it comes to showdowns over a possible government shutdown and default on the nation's debt.

In the United States, 40 percent of the food produced annually goes to waste. Doug Rauch, former president of Trader Joe's, wants to do something about it. He's opening a restaurant that will transform produce past its sell date into healthful take-out food.

Congressional Republicans are trying to use budget deadlines to extract concessions from the president on his signature health care law. And they aren't alone in choosing this time to test the president's mettle — liberal Democrats have been pressuring Obama, too.

Critics of the NSA's secret surveillance hoped the debate that followed Edward Snowden's leaks would prompt the NSA to rethink the operation. Instead, one of the most noticeable effects so far has been a diversion of resources away from intelligence missions toward assessing damage from the leaks.

Leith, N.D.'s residents want to keep control of their town out of the hands of white supremacists. Craig Cobb moved to Leith last year after purchasing 12 properties and he's given most of them away to people who are notorious in the white separatist movement.

Not only are Brazilian artists now getting big play in major museums around the world, but something new is happening inside Brazil: There's a burgeoning appetite for art.

Yamauchi re-imagined Nintendo from a playing-card company to a pioneer in the video game industry. He helped launch games that marked adolescence in the '80s and '90s.

The U.S. is supposed to allow everyone to come to the annual United Nations General Assembly, which opens next week. But Washington has yet to rule on the visa application by Omar al-Bashir, the Sudanese president who's been indicted on genocide charges by the International Criminal Court.

A government shutdown could be looming if political leaders can't work out a federal budget deal. Host Michel Martin asks two former White House insiders, Ron Christie and Corey Ealons, what Congress and the president have to do to a shutdown.

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