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In a long and surprisingly frank interview with Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep, former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates talked about his relationship with the commander in chief and his rivalry with Vice President Joe Biden, and described a deep rift between the approaches of senior military leadership and Obama's young Cabinet.

In this week's podcast, we hear a researcher's objections to hugging, comedian Paul F. Tompkins brings authors back from the dead, and Sharon Jones beats cancer and releases a long-awaited album.

For some Americans, getting high-speed Internet can be a challenge. According to the American Customer Satisfaction Index, consumers rate Internet service providers worse than airlines, the postal service and health insurance in terms of satisfaction.

Ryan Bell was asked to step down from his Seventh-day Adventist congregation in March, after questioning his faith. For his New Year's resolution, Bell has decided to "try on" atheism and put his role as a religious leader — and follower — on hold.

Sunday's Golden Globes celebratie a diverse group of actors, but beyond those standouts, Hollywood is still a tough town for minorities. In a "who-you-know" business, professionals say, the only color that really matters is green.

Four years ago, an earthquake heavily damaged Port-au-Prince and killed more than 200,000 people. Many areas of the Haitian capital now look much like they did before the 7.0-magnitude quake. But nearly 150,000 are still living in temporary structures.

Sunni leaders in Iraq are trying to retake control of two important cities in Anbar province. That's raising fears in Afghanistan, where al-Qaida operatives still reside near the border with Pakistan. The Washington Post's David Ignatius talks to NPR's Rachel Martin about the rise of al-Qaida-affiliated groups and America's relations with Afghanistan.

The new Baseball Hall of Fame inductees were announced this week — and it's not just who got in and who didn't that's causing a stir; the voting itself has people talking. Sports correspondent Mike Pesca speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about that and the reduction of New York Yankee Alex Rodriguez's suspension.

Fans of the band Insane Clown Posse, known as Juggalos, were classified as a gang by the FBI in 2011. Now the band and four fans have filed a lawsuit against the Department of Justice and the FBI. NPR's Rachel Martin talks about the suit with journalist Patrick Flanary, who covered the suit for Rolling Stone magazine.

Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon died Saturday at the age of 85. Israelis mourned the death of the celebrated politician and army general. But Palestinians reacted differently to the death of the controversial leader, who pushed for Jewish settlement of Palestinian territories.

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