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A new study published finds that women who followed a Mediterranean-style of eating in their 50s were about 40 percent more likely to reach the later decades without developing chronic diseases and memory or physical problems, compared to women who didn't eat as well.

States have spent big on setting up their health insurance exchanges. But figuring out where the money is going can be difficult because some states don't release the information. The contractor running Connecticut's marketplace call center hasn't had to reveal pricing.

After her husband cheated, Carol Anne Bond started spreading toxic chemicals on surfaces the other woman might touch. She was caught and convicted of violating the Chemical Weapons Convention. But does a law implementing an international treaty apply when the victim's only injury was a thumb burn?

Roy Choi changed the food truck fad forever when he and his friend started selling Korean barbecue tacos outside clubs in Los Angeles. He talks about his life and his food truck foundations in his new book, L.A. Son: My Life, My City, My Food.

Democrat Bill de Blasio is poised to become the next mayor of New York, in part because he made income inequality the central issue of his campaign. His "tale of two cities" narrative has resonated with voters. But there's debate about what he could do as mayor to narrow the income gap.

Brain scans may help people who were ill treated as children realize that they process fear differently than others. They may have a harder time realizing what's truly a threat and what's not. Researchers say that can lead to increased risk of anxiety and depression.

Huge stone slabs weighing up to 300 tons that now reside in Beijing's Forbidden City were slid more than 40 miles in 15th- and 16th-century China over water-lubricated ice roads in the dead of winter. Though spoked wheels had been around for almost 3,000 years, the ice roads were smoother and required less manpower.

A new billboard in D.C. is asking jurors to forget about the law, and go with their gut when it comes to acquitting defendants. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with two former federal prosecutors about the pros and cons of jury nullification.

The U.S. says the Syrian humanitarian crisis is spiraling out of control. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Anne Richard, Assistant Secretary for Population, Refugees, and Migration at the U.S. Department of State.

The holidays are coming up, and that often means decadent family feasts. But things might be especially sparse for people who rely on food stamps. The Supplemental Nutrition Program, or SNAP, is being scaled back. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Isabel Sawhill of the Brookings Institution about the possible effect.

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