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Afghanistan hopes to reach an important milestone next spring with its first democratic transfer of power. Many familiar faces are vying for the presidency, including a number of powerful warlords. The race will be more about personalities and power bases than policies and political platforms.

Three years after the landmark Citizens United decision, the justices will hear a case that could undercut most of the remaining rules that limit big money in politics. Before the court on Tuesday is a challenge to the aggregate limits on contributions to candidates and political parties.

Humans have debated the concept of an afterlife for millennia. But ultimately, each individual's view on life after death is a personal one. For his part, the Rev. Gabriel Salguero, president of the National Latino Evangelical Coalition, sees eternity as a place where people cast aside the differences that divided them on earth.

The New York City Opera will close its doors this month after 70 years of production. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks to composer Anthony Davis whose work X, The Life and Times of Malcolm X premiered at the opera almost 30 years ago.

Upheaval in countries like Egypt and Syria is often discussed in political terms, but how do artists see it? Guest host Celeste Headlee talks about arts and the Arab Spring with Egyptian-American poet Yahia Lababidi and Syrian-American doctor Dr. Zaher Sahloul.

Political unrest in Egypt might seem low on the list of concerns for the U.S. government. But one commentator says the situation there needs to be dealt with swiftly. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Shadi Hamid, of the Brookings Doha Center, about the risks of forgetting Egypt.

Polls show most Americans oppose the federal government shutdown, but there's no sign that the stalemate will end. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses why minority rule may be winning in U.S. politics with public policy professor Jerry Mayer of George Mason University, and journalist Callie Crossley of public radio station WGBH in Boston.

Millions of U.S. factory jobs have been lost in the past decade. Now, in North Carolina, high school students are being encouraged to think about taking manufacturing jobs. But this isn't the furniture-making or textile labor of generations past — it's a new kind of highly technical work in aviation.

The docket this year has nothing quite as riveting as last year's same-sex marriage cases, or the challenge to President Obama's health care overhaul from the term before. But once again, the court is facing hot-button social issues and questions of presidential and congressional power.

Brothers Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru take an exhaustive look at how the NFL has dealt with allegations that playing football can lead to brain damage. They say the NFL has repeatedly avoided tying football to brain injury, even as they've given disability payments to former players with dementia-related conditions.

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