Listen to NPR Stories Online

Genealogy has become a massive industry, from websites like Ancestry.com to TV shows like Who Do You Think You Are? But those focus on family lineage. What about the heirlooms and stories that fill the history of a family tree? A North Carolina business is trying to help.

In Newtown, Conn., demolition work has started at the Sandy Hook Elementary School. Bricks will be pulverized, steel melted down, and workers must sign agreements forbidding any public discussion of the site. Last year, a shooting there left six adults and 20 students dead.

Kenyans who received money with no strings attached started businesses and bought food for their kids, according to a new study. They didn't spend it on alcohol or cigarettes.

Some clinics say they can't comply with a Texas law set to go into effect next week. It adds building requirements for clinics and places more rules on doctors who perform abortions. Laws like the one in Texas have passed in more than a dozen states.

In Portland, Ore., doctors and patients get to the Oregon Health and Science University not by a twisty, two-lane road up Marquam Hill, but by a gleaming silver gondola. The aerial tram has cut the commute from up to 45 minutes to a three-minute ride in the sky.

For years, many police departments have dealt with child prostitutes by putting them in juvenile detention centers. But federal agencies say that minors are often sex trafficking victims in need of help — and who can, in turn, help put their pimps in jail.

We used the testimonies of the biggest contractors involved with the HealthCare.gov application system to create this guide to how the site's various parts work together, and how the complex system for registering you for health insurance is supposed to work.

The "great recession" may be over, but that doesn't mean that most Americans have access to the opportunities that they used to. Host Michel Martin hears from listeners about how the lack of social and physical mobility is limiting their economic prospects. She discusses the issue with Richard Reeves, a fellow of economic studies at the Brookings Institution.

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is feeling the heat because of all the technical problems with the new health exchange websites. For more on possible fixes, and what it all means for Americans seeking coverage, host Michel Martin talks to Mary Agnes Carey of Kaiser Health News.

Republicans are framing their central question about the troubled Affordable Care Act website this way: Are White House officials clueless or are they liars? A Democratic lawmaker, meanwhile, accuses the GOP of holding a "monkey court."

Pages

©2014 WLRH PUBLIC RADIO

Address

WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions

Phone

LOCAL:
(256) 895-9574

TOLL-FREE:
(800) 239-9574