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The Republican-controlled House is set to vote Friday on a stopgap spending bill to keep the government open for business through the middle of December. And the White House has already said if it makes it to the president's desk, he'll veto it. That's because the bill also would defund the Affordable Care Act.

Dan Miller's father struggled to support a large family and buckled under the conditions of poverty. That experience led Miller to choose to be a better father than the one who raised him.

A media investigation revealed this summer that scores of female inmates received prohibited sterilization procedures in California prisons between 1997 and 2010. State lawmakers are now demanding an audit into the legally questionable tubal ligations, to find out if coercion was involved.

Brazil's Atlantic Forest, home to the golden lion tamarin, was once a massive ecosystem stretching along the Brazilian coast. But centuries of human activity have encroached upon the forest, leaving the future of this tiny, lion-maned monkey in doubt.

President Obama has been able to fill one opening on a key appeals court, but three more remain. And GOP senators are signaling that they'll block those remaining nominations, saying the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals doesn't really need that many judges.

Every victim who arrived at a hospital alive survived the attack. But hospitals say the experience also revealed room for improvement, and they're about to share the lessons they learned at a national conference in Washington, D.C.

One of the really big challenges facing our world is how to grow more food without using up the globe's land and water. One company in Ohio says we've been ignoring one solution: insects. It's using larvae of the black soldier fly to convert waste into feed for fish or pigs.

You may want to think twice before bragging about all of those Twitter followers you've racked up. Apps and websites help figure out which followers are real, fake and "inactive" users.

It has been almost 50 years since President Lyndon Johnson declared a "War on Poverty." But more than 15 percent of Americans still lived in poverty last year, according to a new report by the U.S. Census Bureau. Host Michel Martin discusses how the country is tackling poverty today with researcher Isabel Sawhill and economics professor Martha Bailey.

Document requests by the ACLU of Northern California have produced an inside look at the records of suspicious activity reports gathered by federal authorities. The feds appear to be keeping files on people based on tips that fall far below the threshold of reasonable suspicion.

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