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It's a deadly combination of infection and inflammation striking more than a million Americans every year. Doctors can treat the symptoms of sepsis, but they still can't treat the underlying problem.

An environmental group is behind the class-action suit that says the government is not doing enough to protect citizens. A ruling in the closely watched case is expected next month.

Photographer Matt Black spends his days capturing images that illustrate the impact of the drought on people living in California's Central Valley.

At least 70 ancient sites in the Kathmandu Valley were damaged or destroyed in last month's quake. Archaeologists and others are trying to protect and recover as much as they can, as fast as possible.

On this day in 1997, Boris Kasparov, the world's top chess player, faced off against IBM's chess-playing supercomputer, Deep Blue — and lost. This week, professional poker players are trying something similar in Pittsburgh, and they're winning.

NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Anne Barnard, the New York Times Beirut bureau chief, about the state of the Syrian army. Might an end to four years of fighting be in sight?

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake lifted the citywide curfew and Maryland's governor declared Sunday a day of prayer and peace.

In a week when attention was focused on Baltimore, NPR's Rachel Martin visited the city's New Shiloh Baptist Church. She spoke with Rev. Harold Carter Jr. and a young church member, Caleb Studivant.

An estimated 14,000 people survived April's earthquake in Nepal with serious injuries. NPR's Rachel Martin gets a picture of medical conditions there from American E.R. doctor Bianca Grecu-Jacobs.

Many of Nepal's historic treasures crumbled in last week's earthquake. But generations of wood and stone carvers have spawned a tradition that could help return monuments to their former glory.

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