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When a pregnant woman catches Ebola, the fetus and amniotic fluid are flooded with the virus. The ripple effects of these dangerous deliveries could be more catastrophic than Ebola itself.

Based in Iraq and Syria, the Islamic State is using its chameleon-like branding and financial incentives to attract extremist groups from Egypt's Sinai Peninsula to Libya's Mediterranean coast.

The procedure to give people with single eyelids a crease above their lashes often provokes controversy. NPR's Kat Chow steps past the debate over whether people should do it to get at the why.

A Kurdish businessman decided he'd like to live in the White House. So he is building a 32,000-square-foot version of the U.S. presidential residence in Irbil, near the raging war against ISIS.

A class action lawsuit alleges Ocwen Financial, one of the nation's largest mortgage servicers, charges marked-up and illegal fees. The firm says it will vigorously defend itself against the claims.

Physicians have been warning for years about a coming shortage of primary care doctors. But others say primary care teams that include other types of health workers might fill the gap better.

Ivory Coast is determined to keep Ebola out. The government shut down the border, and enlisted local villagers to serve as informal border security.

Faulty forms of the brain protein tau trigger tangles inside and outside brain cells of Alzheimer's patients. Scientists say figuring out how to stop bad tau's spread from cell to cell might be key.

The long-delayed project is a jobs generator to some and an ecological disaster to others. Ahead of a key Senate vote, we revisit what the Keystone XL pipeline would do and why it's so contentious.

A South African teenager got tired of waiting in the clinic for his grandparents' HIV meds. So he came up with a solution. All it took was a bicycle.

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