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This presidential election, many workers and employers say political vitriol is carrying over into the workplace — making it a potentially hostile environment.

A generation that survived life-threatening bleeds, the HIV epidemic and Hepatitis C now nears retirement with an illness that can mostly be safely managed at home — for about $250,000 a year.

Citing growing evidence that no amount of lead exposure is safe for kids, the American Academy of Pediatrics has called for tighter regulations on the amount of lead in house dust, water and soil.

Amanda Alvear was killed at Pulse nightclub. A week later, on Father's Day, her dad is still grieving for the daughter he lost. But despite his sadness, Daniel Alvear says he forgives the shooter.

Kevin Blackistone of The Washington Post and ESPN explains what's at stake for Steph Curry and LeBron James as their teams face off for the NBA championship.

Dance clubs are a special place for the LGBT community — especially Latinos. Clubgoers in Queens, N.Y. say clubs have been safe spaces, making the Orlando massacre particularly devastating.

Bloomberg View's Megan McArdle argues in a new column that there are real reasons why "decent people" could vote for Donald Trump, even if they disagree with many of his statements.

Professor Michael Eric Dyson argues in a New Republic article that people "have a positive moral obligation to protest the nomination of this racist demagogue" at the GOP convention. He explains why.

The Orlando shooting and Donald Trump's reaction scrambled campaign politics and complicated Trump's relationship with the Republican Party. Meanwhile, senators will vote on gun legislation Monday.

Nigeria is Africa's largest economy. Reuters correspondent Alexis Akwagyiram explains why President Muhammadu Buhari wants to stop pegging the country's currency to the U.S. dollar.

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