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The number of tourists visiting Cuba this year may break last year's record of 3 million. With this weekend's visit by Pope Francis, Cuba's overflowing tourist infrastructure will be put to the test.

School's back in session, and that means the homework's back, too. Here's what you need to know about how much work U.S. students have to do and how to tell the difference between good work and bad.

Cesar Chavez inspired the world; Larry Itliong inspired Cesar Chavez. In 1965, the Filipino laborer led California grape pickers on a strike that would spark the modern farmworker movement.

It's tough to see Jason deCaires Taylor's sculptures firsthand — unless you have scuba gear. Most of them rest under the sea. His latest work is fully visible only when the tide of the Thames recedes.

Pot is legal in Colorado, but the capitol city has outlawed pot bars like those in Amsterdam, leaving tourists who flock to Denver to get high with no legal place to do so. But that may change soon.

Research on fruit flies with different types of insomnia has revealed the same brain pathways that interfere with sleep in people. The result may be better sleeping pills that don't leave you groggy.

A labor dispute at the Port of Portland has brought container shipping from there to a halt. That means lentil and chickpea farmers are having a difficult time getting their crops to foreign markets.

If you watch football this weekend, you'll see lots of ads for daily fantasy sports websites. They let fans bet real money on the performance of players, but aren't considered gambling operations.

Eli and Edythe Broad have been buying works for more than 40 years. They wanted a permanent home for their art — so they've established a museum where anyone can see it for free.

The 71-year-old Rolling Stones guitarist has a new solo album, a new documentary on his life, and a few thoughts to share on the topic of immortality.




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