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Some people are trying to treat autoimmune problems with an unlikely tool: worms that live in your gut, permanently. Scientists are finally starting to figure out whether they work.

Expectations were high, but for Rio's poorest, the games are coming up short. "Who is enjoying the games?" asks one man. "Not the poor. It's only for the tourists." But even tourists are staying away.

New York Times reporter Rukmini Callimachi says ISIS' recruiting efforts focus on both the "mentally unwell" and those who have been "radicalized since birth."

This Arctic species can live longer than any other known animal advanced enough to have a backbone, scientists say — maybe more than 500 years. Their muscles might hold clues that could help humans.

Workers at American slaughterhouses and meat processing plants perform thousands of repetitive motions every day. The work often lead to invisible, yet painful and lasting injuries to their bodies.

With rising home prices and low interest rates, Americans are spending a record amount of money fixing up their kitchens, bathrooms and man-caves. But a lack of skilled workers is limiting the boom.

Farmworkers in South Texas marched 200 miles for better wages and working conditions. But the strike ultimately failed, and workers today face the same problem: growers who systematically underpay.

Slaughterhouses, while safer than decades ago, are some of the country's most hazardous workplaces. They are fined by the government for safety violations, but those fines may not be big enough.

The 10 athletes representing the first-ever refugee team received a stadium-rattling ovation at the opening ceremony. They hope to send a message about refugees that reaches far beyond the Rio Games.

Puerto Rico has more reported cases of Zika than many other places in the region, and the number of cases continues to rise. Unfortunately, Zika is just one of the island's many problems.




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