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David Savona of Cigar Aficionado talks about the lifting of restrictions on importing cigars from Cuba, and why Cuban cigars are so special to smokers.

With just over three weeks until Election Day, Dr. Michael McDonald, an associate professor of political science at the University of Florida, discusses early voting patterns in 2016.

University students in South Africa have been protesting for weeks, demanding the government make university free. They say the goal is equal access for poor blacks, the country's majority.

To pass the time on the road, political correspondent Don Gonyea creates playlists curated to the story and state. With the campaign end drawing near, Don has his playlist for the final few weeks.

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to Joseph Garcia of the Morrison Institute for Public Policy at Arizona State University about how the 2016 Presidential race has become remarkably competitive in Arizona — an historically Republican stronghold.

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to John Birky a Kansas doctor who talks to us about his community's reaction after police foiled a plot to bomb an apartment complex housing Somali refugees.

A San Francisco organization reunites homeless people — or "houseless" people — with their families through social media. They want to reconnect 1 million people in the next five years.

People can be found riding bicycles on sidewalks around the country. But should sidewalks double as bike lanes?

There are deep emotions in the African-American community behind this election's lopsided poll numbers: dissatisfaction, nostalgia, and even disgust.

Countries around the world have agreed to limit the type of greenhouse gases known as hydrofluorocarbons. Andrew Light of the World Resources Institute talks about what it means for climate change.




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