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How do you spy on a country when decision-making is concentrated in the mind of one man? U.S. spooks' traditional tools — from NSA intercepts to satellite imagery to espionage — are coming up short.

For Muslim-Americans, there was a world before Sept. 11 and after. Now, the dual threats of extremism and atheism threaten them further. A group of friends in D.C. voice their frustrations, and hopes.

Sanders has a steep hill to climb to win enough delegates in the presidential primary. But he doesn't seem deterred, telling NPR, "I am used to climbing steep hills."

NPR's David Folkenflik spoke with the recently departed talk show host and with the president of MSNBC. Harris-Perry said her show was "taken"; her boss said it was "loved."

Some 150,000 Afghan migrants arrived in Germany last year. But the Germans estimate more than half won't qualify for asylum. A small number have turned around and headed home.

The National Park Service has a longstanding diversity problem in its workforce and visitors. As the Park Service celebrates 100 years and looks to its next 100, it wants to change that.

NPR's Kelly McEvers spoke with Jelani Cobb, who has charted the genesis and evolution of the Black Lives Matter movement.

The 35-room limestone mansion is so decrepit that there have been calls for its demolition. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau refuses to live there. The big question: what to do with the place?

Apartment buildings are going up all over Manhattan, but it's harder than ever to find an affordable place to live in New York. It's a scene played out nationwide as rents soar and wages stall.

Recent forecasts for global growth have been ratcheted down, even as oil prices sink lower and put more money in consumers' wallets. Economists see several factors changing things.

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