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Ah, the sweet taste of victory. And now there's scientific evidence to back that up. NPR's Linda Wertheimer talks to researcher Robin Dando at Cornell, who used hockey fans to test his theory.

States are starting to move away from using solitary confinement in prison. NPR's Linda Wertheimer speaks with Bernie Warner, who is overseeing moving prisoners out of solitary in Washington.

Migrants in Hungary are now being allowed on trains that are heading to the Austrian border. NPR's Linda Wertheimer speaks to correspondent Eleanor Beardsley, who is boarding a train with them.

A Kentucky county clerk remains in custody this weekend after refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. The nation is divided, but what does Rowan County think about what's happening?

Thousands of migrants, many fleeing war and poverty in Syria and Iraq, are traveling through Hungary to Austria and Germany. European leaders are struggling to cope with the humanitarian crisis.

Terrified of frequent suicide attacks and fed up with a plummeting economy, Iraqis see the mass migration in Europe as a chance to get out of the country.

When Congress returns from summer recess Tuesday, it will tackle the Iran nuclear deal, but that won't be its only big issue. NPR's Scott Simon gets the details from correspondent Scott Horsley.

Only one person can win the presidency in 2016, and some of the 22 running have scant chance of victory. So why are they in the race? Many hope luck is on their side, but some might have other goals.

Friday's decent but unspectacular jobs report didn't answer the question of whether the Fed is about to raise interest rates. But even if the Fed finally takes the plunge, it will do so very gradually.

Police in Adygea, Russia, are creating special police detail for wedding parties, where guests celebrate by shooting guns in the air and driving recklessly.




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