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As kindergarten becomes the new first grade, some worry that the joy of learning is being lost with higher rigor.

She's one of a record 65 million refugees in the world today. Home is now a makeshift camp in Niger, buffeted by Sahara desert sands and winds.

As Britain prepares to vote on whether to leave the European Union, we take a look at the country with the highest per capita income of any EU nation. It has clearly benefited from EU membership.

Jonathan Balcombe, author of What A Fish Knows, says that fish have a conscious awareness — or "sentience" — that allows them to experience pain, recognize individual humans and have memory.

On a beach resort in southern South Korea, the government sponsors camps each year where kids as young as 11 are taught about North Koreans, to prepare for a peaceful "reunification" — one day.

This presidential election, many workers and employers say political vitriol is carrying over into the workplace — making it a potentially hostile environment.

A generation that survived life-threatening bleeds, the HIV epidemic and Hepatitis C now nears retirement with an illness that can mostly be safely managed at home — for about $250,000 a year.

Citing growing evidence that no amount of lead exposure is safe for kids, the American Academy of Pediatrics has called for tighter regulations on the amount of lead in house dust, water and soil.

Amanda Alvear was killed at Pulse nightclub. A week later, on Father's Day, her dad is still grieving for the daughter he lost. But despite his sadness, Daniel Alvear says he forgives the shooter.

The Orlando shooting and Donald Trump's reaction scrambled campaign politics and complicated Trump's relationship with the Republican Party. Meanwhile, senators will vote on gun legislation Monday.

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