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Ukraine and the Russia-backed rebels have announced a cease-fire agreement set to go into effect Friday.

Police in Ferguson, Mo., started wearing video cameras this week. What effect do they have on behavior? A criminologist reviews the (preliminary) evidence.

There's nothing like an ambulance when you really need one, but they're expensive, and a lot of people who call an ambulance would actually be better served with a different, cheaper kind of care.

Thousands of workers for the supermarket chain forced the company to back down and restore their CEO. One expert says the labor movement needs to be as creative as those workers to win the next fight.

Ben Hewitt's sons do not follow standardized curriculum; there are no tests or grades. He is a member of the "unschooling" movement.

Over the next six months, about 20,000 people will get Ebola. Half will likely die. To stop the virus, the World Health Organization says it needs thousands of health care workers and $600 million.

The Service Employees International Union ssays that workers will strike in 150 cities to call for the fast food industry to adopt a minimum wage of $15 an hour.

The 150-city protest for a minimum wage hike comes at a time when other changes are putting more pressure on businesses to pay their workers more. Home health care workers joining the fight also raises the issue of overtime rules, which are expected out from the Labor Department in November.

The Justice Department investigation is likely to last for months and could result in a court-enforceable agreement to improve things like hiring and training of police in the Missouri city.

A federal judge has ruled that British Petroleum is guilty of gross negligence in the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion and oil spill. The decision means BP might be fined billions of dollars in penalties for its role.

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