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The Huffington Post says it won't cover Donald Trump as a political story, despite his surge in the polls. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with The New York Times' Jeremy Peters about Trump's popularity.

America's top math students went head-to-head with competitors from more than 100 countries — and they won. "If you can even solve one question," their head coach says, "you're a bit of a genius."

As his Alzheimer's progresses, journalist Greg O'Brien and his wife have decided it's time to leave the home where they raised their three kids. The move is turning up some sweet discoveries.

Sarah Shourd, who was imprisoned by Iran in 2009, calls the nuclear deal a "win-win." It doesn't demand Americans' release, but she says it makes it less useful for Iran to keep hostages for leverage.

The International Atomic Energy Agency can have 130 to 150 inspectors to keep tabs on Iran's nuclear program. The U.S. is paying the largest share, but probably won't have inspectors inside Iran.

Martin O'Malley, Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, Jim Webb and Lincoln Chafee all appeared together for the first time at a cattle call in Iowa on Friday. Each had 15 minutes to make a pitch.

Yale professor and author Stephen Carter says the agreement is so complex, something is bound to go wrong — but that doesn't make it a bad deal. He speaks with NPR's Scott Simon.

Alaska's fire season is off to an unprecedented start. Millions of acres are burning across hundreds of miles of rugged terrain, making the challenging task of fighting fire in Alaska even harder.

A year ago, a Malaysian jetliner was shot down over Eastern Ukraine, killing everyone on board. NPR's Scott Simon and Michael Bociurkiw of the OSCE discuss the investigation.

The diverse stock market could be a way to road-test Iran's economy. But experts warn of unique pitfalls: the key role the Revolutionary Guard plays in the economy and the lack of transparency.




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