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What happens when a shopping mall dies? Often they're turning into medical centers, churches, schools and universities and new suburban downtowns.

Officials want to overhaul the state's energy grid. Experts say the plan would help utilities withstand severe weather events, but it would also require a massive re-engineering of the power system.

As the midterm elections near, Republicans are increasingly confident they will control both houses of Congress. But even if they do, the clashes will likely continue.

Longer lives means more decades of intimacy. Drugs that help male physiology match desire have affected more than just the body, men who take these pills say.

The farming town of Barkedu accounts for a fifth of Liberia's Ebola deaths. Residents have revved up anti-Ebola efforts. But the virus has swept away entire families, and there's no end in sight.

Domestic cats, high-rises and vanishing habitat are taking a toll on more than 33 species of American birds, a comprehensive update reports. Still, wetland and coastal birds are faring better.

They were talented, idealistic risk takers, on the road to what they thought would be important medical discoveries. But when the funding for risk takers dried up, these two academics called it quits.

As Islamic State militants have marched across Syria and Iraq, oil smuggling has been a major part of their strategy. They have targeted oil fields and refineries and work with a range of middlemen.

Pushed by rivals like Samsung, Apple is likely to announce bigger iPhones on Tuesday. Users of bigger-screen devices say they prefer their larger images and the ability to see multiple apps together.

A new Audubon report shows how climate change could affect the ranges of 588 North American bird species by the end of the century. Bald eagles, loons and orioles are among those facing major threats.

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