Listen to NPR Stories Online

Joel Brenner, now an MIT senior researcher, says President Trump's statement that he might partner with Putin on cyber issues is a reversal of decades of well-founded American suspicion of Russia.

The United Kingdom won't actually leave the European Union until 2019, but there are already signs British employers could lose crucial foreign workers, from university professors to apple pickers.

President Trump's eldest son admitted to meeting a Kremlin-linked lawyer after being offered information that could have been "helpful" to his father's campaign.

A three-judge panel begins a weeklong trial Monday over whether Texas's political maps discriminate against minorities. If so, the state could be forced to redistrict before the 2018 election.

China "continues to walk on eggshells" when it comes to North Korea, says historian Jonathan Pollack. NPR's Rachel Martin asks Pollack about about North Korea's fraught relationship with its neighbor.

Researchers from Emory University, using functional MRIs to measure fathers' brains, found that they had different biological reactions to their daughters' faces than to their sons'.

That's the situation in Senegal. The government has promised to buy new machines. But one cancer specialist says there isn't enough attention given to the disease.

It's the world's biggest coral reef system, home to some 400 types of coral. In the past 18 months, rising ocean temperatures helped cause the single greatest loss of coral ever recorded there.

On Sunday, South Sudan marks six years as independent country. Between its civil war and humanitarian crisis, things are so bad that anniversary celebrations were canceled.

An estimated 1.3 million teens struggle with substance use disorders. For teenagers in Wisconsin, there is only one high school that treats students' addiction while they earn a diploma.

Pages

©2017 WLRH PUBLIC RADIO

Address

WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions

Phone

LOCAL:
(256) 895-9574

TOLL-FREE:
(800) 239-9574