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People who have never experienced earthquakes are starting to feel rumbles, which scientists say may be linked to the rise in oil and gas activity. Along with the quakes are shockingly loud noises that can put residents on edge.

Vote-trading scandals in the 1998 and 2002 Olympics forced the International Skating Union to make major changes to its judging system, including obscuring which judge issued which mark. Sports correspondent Mike Pesca discusses the issue of transparency and subjectivity in Olympics judging with NPR's Rachel Martin.

U.S. Olympic teams have been more successful in speedskating than in any other winter sport. The secret to their success includes talent, skill and hard work, but there's also a network of support that buoys the team.

This coming week, the U.S. Agency for International Development plans to announce a new monitoring program that is designed to keep track of the aid dollars being spent in Afghanistan. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Larry Sampler, head of USAID programs in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Letters written in a time of war reflect almost universal longing and loss, no matter the century or the enemy. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Andrew Carroll, the director of the Center for American War Letters, about his personal collection of wartime correspondence from every American conflict, going back to 1776.

France became the first European country this week to join a worldwide effort to destroy ivory. The goal is to send a warning to ivory traffickers and to anyone who might not consider buying it a serious crime.

Al-Qaida's central leadership has cut ties with the Islamic State of Iraq in Syria, or ISIS. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Jessica Stern, author of Terror in the Name of God: Why Religious Militants Kill, about what this split tells us about the future of al-Qaida.

Humanitarian workers continue to try to evacuate civilians from the besieged Syrian city of Homs as negotiators in Geneva prepare for the next round of peace talks. NPR's Rachel Martin gets the latest from reporter Alice Fordham in Geneva.

Tennessee's governor has proposed to pay community college tuition for anyone who needs it. The plan is intended to help boost higher education completion rates for the state, which ranks near the bottom nationwide.

The very first car developed by Ferdinand Porsche was not a sleek speed machine. The wooden-framed, open-carriage P1 was recently unearthed in a garage in Austria where it sat for more than 100 years. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Achim Stejskal, director of the Porsche Museum about the surprising find.

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