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In his new book, exiled Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng tells the story of growing up blind, being beaten under house arrest and finding refuge in the American Embassy in Beijing in 2012.

Haiti can't survive on handouts alone. So instead of giving people electricity, one entrepreneur is selling it to them for a profit. For one village, that means finally having cold treats.

In a part of Northern California better known for cattle ranches than grapes, the monks of New Clairvaux abbey are cultivating the art of winemaking. The hard work feeds the spirit and the coffers.

Pickup truck-size ice chunks have left the freight ships stuck in Lake Superior. The U.S. and Canadian coast guards have sent in icebreakers to help the ships get through.

Doctors long ago noticed that, beyond the usual influences of diet and smoking, short people seem to get heart disease more often than tall people. But why?

Even with vacancies, most Seattle shelters don't let families stay right away. A system designed to alleviate homelessness has resulted in a bottleneck that leaves families on the streets for longer.

Colorado wildlife officials believe someone released four or five pet goldfish into Teller Lake #5 a few years ago. Now, the fish number in the thousands and threaten the lake's ecosystem.

State Rep. Wendell Gilliard, D-S.C., discusses the fatal shooting of Walter Scott by a police officer in North Charleston, S.C.

The same receptor on nerve endings that makes sinuses tingle when we eat wasabi plays an important role in the pain of inflammation. The first 3-D view of the receptor could lead to better pain drugs.

The mayor and police chief of the South Carolina town met relatives of Walter Scott, the man who was shot in the back as he ran from a policeman. Video of the shooting contradicts the officer's story.

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