Listen to NPR Stories Online

How does the U.S. destroy the self-declared Islamic State without aiding the Syrian regime? NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Christopher Harmer of the Institute for the Study of War about options.

A federal judge in Alabama is facing mounting calls for his resignation. U.S. District Judge Mark Fuller was arrested in August for allegedly beating his wife.

Scotland has a proud national tradition of poetry. Days after a historic referendum on independence, we look at how poems by Scottish writers can help us better understand this moment.

The Ebola epidemic is growing exponentially. And clinics don't have space for patients. So the U.S. government is giving families kits for treating people at home. Will this help slow the epidemic?

National Republican Party officials encouraged 2014 candidates to launch positive ads targeting women. One for a House candidate from Minnesota touts an annual charity walk he does in pink heels.

Videotaped murders by Islamic State have sparked outrage around the world. But while some European countries have paid ransom to retrieve victims taken by ISIS, Britain and the U.S. have not.

On the anniversary of the iconic series, NPR's Eric Deggans talks with the author of a new Bill Cosby biography about how the show and the comedian have shaped perceptions of black families.

The Common Core has arguably become the most contentious issue in American education. Experts face off over the new state standards in the latest Intelligence Squared debate.

Earlier this week, NASA awarded two contracts for new spaceships to commercial companies. Here's how they compare.

Lori Baker uses DNA samples to track down the loved ones of immigrants who died on their journeys. "I would love not to do this anymore, but I don't think I have it in me not to," she says.

Pages

©2014 WLRH PUBLIC RADIO

Address

WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions

Phone

LOCAL:
(256) 895-9574

TOLL-FREE:
(800) 239-9574