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Rey Junco of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society breaks down recent developments on net neutrality and the control of information online.

The New York Times has fired Jill Abramson, making Dean Baquet the paper's first African-American executive editor. The move has sparked a debate about newsroom diversity and 'editing while female.'

"It's kind of like trying to find a date before the prom," one analyst says of consolidation in the media industry. Some experts are criticizing the deal's strategy and potential impact on consumers.

President Park Geun-hye announced the changes a bit more than one month after the ferry Sewol sank, killing more than 300 people. It also comes as South Korea prepares to hold national elections.

Pennsylvania is among six states holding primary elections Tuesday. Gov. Tom Corbett is unchallenged in the GOP primary, but the general election is a different story.

Small jolts of electricity to the brain can treat diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's. But some healthy people are trying electrical stimulation to make the brain sharper. And it may not be safe.

A huge hit upon its release, the 1949 musical South Pacific still resonates with contributors to The Race Card Project — particularly a song about how prejudice is learned, not innate.

DNA from the skeleton of a 12,000-year-old teenage girl found on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula shows that today's Native Americans are descended from Siberians who spread southward across North America.

Guest host Tess Vigeland checks in with NPR's Julie McCarthy about the elections in India and the country's new prime minister, Narendra Modi.

The Asian citrus psyllid is a tiny bug that spreads a devastating tree disease. Pesticides can't always control it, so California farmers have turned to a different solution: another bug.

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