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Scientists now think the entire outbreak in West Africa was triggered by one person and then the virus took off from there. Early signs pointed to a little boy in southern Guinea.

One company and its algorithms are changing the way America's schools handle classroom ethics.

The small, gas-rich Arabian Gulf nation of Qatar played a key role in freeing U.S. hostage Peter Theo Curtis after nearly two years in Syria.

A researcher says startups Uber and Lyft aren't really ridesharing services. An emerging set of services being tested promises to be more about sharing and less about being like taxis.

Mexico is inaugurating a new elite police force, a gendarmerie of 5,000 highly trained officers. The force was a campaign pledge by President Enrique Pena Nieto. His administration has touted a decrease in violent crimes, but despite the dip, the rate of kidnappings is up in many of the country's states.

Before the earthquake that struck Napa, Calif., an earthquake early warning system blared an alarm 10 seconds early. Doug Given, the Earthquake Early Warning coordinator for the U.S. Geological Survey, tells Melissa Block about the system that he's helped to institute.

A new outbreak of Ebola is being reported in the Democratic Republic of Congo. But scientists say it's not related to the Ebola epidemic going on in West Africa.

The wine industry in California's Napa Valley is taking stock of the damage from this weekend's magnitude 6.0 earthquake.

It's been two weeks since the 18-year-old was shot and killed by police in Ferguson, Mo. Large crowds are expected to attend Brown's funeral Monday; his dad asked for peace after weeks of protests.

The tweet joked about the burning of the White House 200 years ago by the British. It unleashed many tweets from Americans who didn't think relations were special enough for that kind of ribbing.

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