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The founder of WikiLeaks talks about what it's like to be confined to a building for more than three years. He says he misses nothing from the outside world, apart from his children and his mother.

Justice Antonin Scalia's body lies in repose on Friday at the Supreme Court where dignitaries — including the president — and the general public will pay their respects.

For Iranian tourists at this ancient Persian capital, awe for the past is tempered by disappointment about the present. "We have nothing new that makes us special in the world," says one visitor.

A report from doctors in Argentina raises the possibility that a mosquito pesticide could be responsible for an increase in microcephaly in Brazil. But many top scientists strongly disagree.

There have been several cases of abandoned babies already — at least three in Rio. And a psychologist believes that some men will walk out on their partner if a newborn has the birth defect.

Grieving the loss of a loved one to drug overdose can be difficult when it is mixed with guilt and remorse. But support is scarce for those who are left behind.

The rural homeless often crash with friends or stay in cheap motels on cold nights due to a lack of shelters. But this means homeless tallies miss them — and the state gets less funding to help them.

Paul Clement, who clerked for Scalia on the Supreme Court and went on to argue dozens of cases before the court — and Scalia — as solicitor general, remembers the judge who died Saturday.

In the wake of Antonin Scalia's death, Patrick Leahy of Vermont, the Senate Judiciary Committee's ranking Democrat, argues that President Obama should be the one to nominate Scalia's replacement.

Obama will travel to Cuba in the coming weeks, a senior administration official tells NPR. It will be the first visit by a sitting U.S. president in 88 years. CNN's Patrick Oppmann in Havana has more.

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