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An overwhelming win for India's conservative opposition party could profoundly change the direction of the world's largest democracy. But what do Indian Americans think?

Five weeks after hundreds of Nigerian school girls were abducted by the extremist group Boko Haram, bomb blasts have hit two cities. Journalist Chika Oduah gives an update on the volatile situation.

In 1983, the high court ruled judges can't jail someone because they're too poor to pay their fines and fees. But an NPR investigation found judges still use jail time as punishment for non-payment.

The recent FDA approval of an HPV test to screen for cervical cancer has ignited debate among doctors. Some say the viral test will catch cancers earlier. Others warn it increases needless biopsies.

Legal pot sales are growing in Colorado, and the state has a marijuana DUI blood standard for drivers. But without a pot breathalyzer, it's hard to measure how high someone is.

The plastic beads in some face soaps look a lot like fish food when they end up in the water. Two states are close to banning the beads, which researchers say can spread toxins through the food chain.

Hoboken, N.J., has experienced several major floods since Hurricane Sandy. Mayor Dawn Zimmer says her city isn't waiting to prepare for the effects of climate change.

Coffee prices have spiked this year because of drought in Brazil and a disease that's crippling coffee production in parts of Central America. Coffee traders says prices could rise to $3 a pound.

Many of sports history's greatest athletes never led their teams to a championship victory. So why should it be a requirement for basketball stars today?

In the next installment of an NPR investigation, Joseph Shapiro goes to New Orleans to look at the ways poor people are charged for their public defender in court.

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