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The daily pill, called Addyi, modestly increased women's interest in sex in clinical tests. The approval was praised by some women's advocates as a milestone and condemned by others as irresponsible.

In Hamburg, home to one of Europe's busiest ports, support for trade is fervent. But many Germans have their doubts about a proposed trans-Atlantic agreement that is expected next year.

Years after the subprime mortgage crisis, New Jersey has the nation's highest rate of zombie homes — abandoned by their former owners but not yet through foreclosure. Some sit vacant for years.

Musicians in Kenya want a law forcing radio stations to play 70 percent local music. Nigeria and South Africa have similar rules. But this kind of protectionism could backfire.

The pangolin, a shy, scaly animal resembling an anteater, is being hunted into extinction, conservationists say. New efforts are underway to protect this exotic creature.

After a six-year delay, Medicare proposes to reimburse doctors who hold end-of-life discussions with Medicare patients. The federal program is now soliciting public comments on the idea.

The Republican presidential candidate and former Hewlett-Packard CEO has received much attention — and strong poll numbers — since her performance at a candidate forum in early August.

The group Black Girls CODE holds summer boot camps that teach basics of app design and development. The nonprofit aims to inspire more girls to reach for a career in high-tech.

The spill of heavy metals into the Animas River has contaminated water for hundreds of farmers in the Navajo Nation downstream, bringing up memories of past environmental disasters.

An effort to award the medal to military personnel who died in the bombing has reopened discussion about who is entitled to one. A veterans group says the attack was not international terrorism.

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