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The debate over Keystone XL is nothing compared to the battle over the nation's first commercial oil pipeline. It transformed how energy was transported forever — but not without sabotage and threats.

Shifts in climate in the Middle Ages likely drove plague bacteria from gerbils in Asia to people in Europe, research now suggests. Rats don't deserve all the blame.

"I'm not ever going to forget what I've done," says a woman once convicted of prostitution. "But, at the same time, I don't want it thrown in my face every time I'm trying to seek employment."

Jordanians are now supportive of the military campaign against the Islamic State. But King Abdullah still faces domestic opponents, religious and secular, who chafe at restrictions at home.

Vocational education is enjoying a renaissance in many U.S. schools. In Nashville, Tenn., all high-schoolers are encouraged to take three career-training classes, regardless of college plans.

Roberta Jacobson, the U.S. official who will lead negotiations on reestablishing diplomatic ties with the Cubans, says that this will be a long journey, but she has hope for better relations.

The College Board redesigned the framework for its Advanced Placement U.S. history course, and many conservative lawmakers aren't happy about it.

Young people between the ages of 18 and 35 spend hundreds of millions of dollars a year. NPR asked some in this group how brands and corporations can get their attention.

A levee project would cordon off lucrative farmland along the Mississippi River in southeastern Missouri. But towns in Illinois say that puts them at risk of flooding while protecting rich farmers.

Oklahoma oil is expensive to produce, so the sharp drop in prices has forced many drilling companies to cut jobs. If prices stay low, the pain could spread to the banks that finance the oil industry.

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