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This summer's killings of black men and the Black Lives Matter movement have rekindled calls in some parts of the African-American community to support black-owned businesses. That's not always easy.

For the past four years, the U.S. government has engaged in an ambitious campaign for LGBT rights around the world. But American support can be a double-edged sword.

A first-aid class in Philadelphia is designed to help people learn how to keep shooting victims alive until the paramedics arrive. It teaches skills such as applying tourniquets to stop bleeding.

Republican Sens. John McCain of Arizona and Marco Rubio of Florida are favored to win their GOP primaries on Tuesday. So is Democrat Debbie Wasserman Schultz despite angry opposition.

Opponents of Russian President Vladimir Putin and former colleagues who have fallen from favor seem to be dying at an unusual rate. Russia-watchers believe the deaths are not random.

As students head back to school, districts are faced with age-old problem of making sure they show up. In St. Louis, one principal resorted to extreme measures: installing washing machines and dryers.

Vincent Simonetti started playing tuba in high school in the 1950s. It was love at first puff. Now he and his wife, Ethel, have filled a house in Durham, N.C., with tubas for the public to tour.

Surfers once deemed man-made waves weak and mushy compared to the best that break along the coast. Then engineers and an 11-time world champion surfer showed just how good an artificial wave can be.

As police find themselves in encounters that are posted live — including video — they sometimes want to pull the social media plug. But activists say this threatens to censor an electronic witness.

Think of it as a gift within a gift. Some beneficial gut bacteria contain viruses called "bacteriophages." And some of these phages now have been associated with good intestinal health in humans.

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