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The breakthrough in the Senate to reopen the government came on the first weekday of the shutdown, when federal workers were trying to sort out whether to report for duty.

Harvard professors Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt are experts in what makes democracies healthy — and what leads to their collapse. They warn that American democracy is in trouble.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sat down with NPR's Nina Totenberg at the Sundance Film Festival on Sunday where she discussed her thoughts on the #MeToo movement.

Current and former special agents worry that the Bureau's tumble through the political spin cycle might hurt their ability to do their jobs across the country.

Popular DNA ancestry tests don't always find what people expect. That's due to how DNA rearranges itself when egg meets sperm, and also the quirks of genetic databases.

There's an explosion of interest in personalized diet approaches and at-home test kits are popping up everywhere. Part of the approach includes analyzing your DNA, but genes can only tell us so much.

Conservatives are thrilled with President Trump for confirming a Supreme Court justice and 12 federal appeals court judges. Civil rights advocates are troubled by a lack of diversity.

Over the past year, three lawsuits have alleged that President Trump is failing to obey the Constitution's anti-corruption clauses. One suit has been dismissed. Now another is about to get a hearing.

A gravely ill man arrives at the hospital, alone and unconscious, with a tattoo across his chest: "Do Not Resuscitate." It sparks deep conversation about end-of-life care in America.

Contrary to what you might see on TV, homicide, assault and rapes have decreased in big cities since the 1970s. Patrick Sharkey attributes the change, in part, to something that happened in the '90s.

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