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In an interview with NPR to be broadcast this week, the president spoke strongly of his critics, including some in his own party. He also talked about letting his passions show more in his sixth year.

Before the Great Recession, many Americans piled up too much credit card debt. Now, they seem to be a little wiser about using plastic, says the head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Dozens of games and apps claim to improve your memory or make you smarter or reduce stress. But do they really? Developers say the next step is clinically valid poof of cognitive gains.

Overall, residents say areas ranging from jobs creation and access to public transportation have improved greatly. But a new poll also reveals a widening racial divide in perceptions of the recovery.

The death of the highly respected hip-hop figure prompted an outpouring of tribute and personal stories from his community this weekend.

Lawmakers and human rights groups have criticized a 2015 State Department report on human trafficking, saying politics may have interfered with the evaluation of countries' human rights records.

Haitians vote Sunday in parliamentary elections that are three years overdue. The parliament was dissolved after Haiti's government failed to hold a vote. Reporter Peter Granitz explains.

Hundreds gathered in the St. Louis suburb one year after Michael Brown was killed there by a police officer. Starsky Wilson, the Ferguson Commission's co-chair, sees reason to hope — and keep working.

In Ferguson, Mo., people marked the anniversary of the 18-year-old's death with a moment of silence and a church service. Camille Phillips of St. Louis Public Radio reports on the day's activities.

Africa marks one year without polio on Tuesday. But there are now concerns in Kenya, where bishops have declared a boycott of the vaccine on the eve of a WHO polio vaccination campaign.




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