Listen to NPR Stories Online

The split dates from when Christianity first spread through the Roman Empire. Friday's meeting between Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill is the culmination of longstanding efforts to promote dialogue.

His proposed "speculation tax" — a small levy on every stock, bond or derivative sold in the U.S. — would fund higher education. Estimates of how much revenue it might raise vary greatly.

The Nevada rancher's arrest is a setback for his self-styled militia supporters and their anti-federal lands fight. The charges stem from a standoff with federal agents at his ranch in 2014.

More companies are offering employees training to deal with shooting threats at work. But it presents a dilemma: "How do you create awareness, without creating paranoia?" one expert says.

Some of the genetic variations in human DNA that have been linked to quick clotting or depression or diabetes lie within or near the genetic stretches we picked up from Neanderthals, a study finds.

New Yorker writer Jill Lepore examines the history of polling in America. She tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that today's polls may be less reliable — and more influential — than ever before.

David Greene talks with David Wessel of the Wall Street Journal and the Brookings Institution about the causes and effects of the ongoing slide in global markets.

Shiite-majority Iran is home to millions of Sunnis, including the Sunni imam who opened his door to NPR's Steve Inskeep in Tehran. "We live together nicely," he insists. But he must speak with care.

Americans of all ages are tossing away the keys and giving up their driver's licenses, a new study shows. Cars are being replaced by bikes, public transit and ride-hailing services.

Most polls show Hillary Clinton beating Bernie Sanders soundly in the state's upcoming primary, due to overwhelming black support. But many young black voters are turning lukewarm on Clinton.

Pages

©2016 WLRH PUBLIC RADIO

Address

WLRH Public Radio
UAH Campus
John Wright Drive
Huntsville, AL 35899

Get Directions

Phone

LOCAL:
(256) 895-9574

TOLL-FREE:
(800) 239-9574