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Six months after Detroit emerged from bankruptcy, Michel Martin heads there to hear from the artists, thinkers and entrepreneurs who are shaping the city's future.

A mysterious set of medical complications plagues some survivors: joint pain, vision loss, rashes. Doctors aren't sure why it's all happening. But they have a name for it: post-Ebola syndrome.

Thirteen-year-old Nicholas Heyward Jr. was playing with a toy gun in the stairwell of the housing complex where he lived in Brooklyn when a police officer shot and killed him in 1994.

John Sopko says the Afghans still do a poor job of managing the billions they get from the U.S. and he's documented the abuses. Still, he supports the ongoing U.S. efforts there.

The green health halo hovering over kale glows brightly, and the company is putting it in breakfast bowls in nine southern California locations. Will it help brighten up the Golden Arches?

Ayelet Shaked is a secular Jew who belongs to a religious party closely tied to West Bank settlers. She's faced criticism for controversial statements about Palestinians.

The city has some of the highest auto insurance rates in the U.S. Many residents there drop coverage — or claim they live outside the city limits. The mayor has a plan to cut the cost of insurance.

Historian Richard Rothstein studies residential segregation in America. His conclusion: "federal, state and local governments purposely created racial boundaries in these cities."

No one has been a late-night TV host longer than David Letterman, who retires Wednesday after 33 years. Here's what he told TV Critic Eric Deggans about leaving the Ed Sullivan Theater one last time.

A mouse brain boasts more than 200 different kinds of cells, say scientists, who are busy cataloging everything known about each type. Next up: a data trove of details on human brain cells.

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