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On June 28, 1914, the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand sparked World War I. NPR's Ari Shapiro takes a tour of the city and learns the improbable story behind that shot heard round the world.

An unusual constitutional rule stands in between Myanmar's most famous political prisoner and the presidency. And despite popular protest, an amendment, at the moment, appears unlikely.

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus has killed more than 7 million piglets in the past year. There's no cure, but a vaccine that may protect piglets has been approved even though it's still being tested.

During the U.S. war in Iraq, American forces paid Sunni tribal leaders in the western and northern regions of the country to turn against al-Qaida. The episode was called the "Sunni Awakening." But now, with ISIS consolidating its gains in these same regions, the tribes involved in the Awakening are cutting deals with the militant group or staying on the sidelines entirely. Shashank Bengali of The Los Angeles Times explains.

A prominent Libyan human rights worker was assassinated Wednesday. NPR's Leila Fadel interviewed Salwa Bugaighis earlier this month and remembers the lawyer's efforts against former dictator Moammar Gadhi's regime.

The Supreme Court has struck down a Massachusetts law that requires a buffer zone around clinics offering abortion services. Advocacy groups on both sides of the issue offer their reactions.

The Obama administration is backing away from plans to loosen deportation guidelines. On the eve of the one-year anniversary of the Senate's passage of a comprehensive immigration reform bill, reform advocates concede any changes in immigration laws likely won't come until 2017.

Bosnia has been buried in historic floods and paralyzed by political dysfunction. Now, locals in Sarajevo are frustrated that the world has only begun focusing on the region for the upcoming anniversary of Archduke Franz Ferdinand's assassination, which helped trigger World War I.

The chaos in Iraq has Turks reconsidering their opposition to autonomy for Iraq's Kurds. Turks have viewed the issue as too provocative for the millions of Kurds living in Turkey; now, though, more Turks see the Kurds as a possible security buffer between Turkey and Iraqi extremists.

The court limited presidential power to make appointments when the Senate isn't in session and narrowed a state's power to have protest-free zones outside abortion clinics. Here are the implications.

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